The Quest for Optimal Health #3

The Quest for Optimal Health
#3

Continuing our Quest we take a look at the final Macronutrient. In this article we will take a look at those muscle building proteins!. Short Read 1-3 mins.

By Cassius Fragomeni

What is

Incredibly vital to our everyday functions, protein plays many important roles within the bodys mechanisms. Protein is essentially a group amino acids that perform different functions based upon their individual molecular compositions.

Essential Acids

These Amino acids as the name suggests are vital for our bodies to function properly however we are unable to produce naturally in the body. Thus the only source for these essential amino acids is the foods that we consume, meaning it’s critical that our diet contains these proteins.

Non-Essential Acids & Conditionally Essential

Unlike essential acids, these acids can be produced within the body from other chemicals in the bloodstream. Allowing for us to function even in the absence of certain food types and resources that would produce these essential acids. 

However for people at different developmental stages in life (Infancy, Puberty, Old Age etc.) or those who have certain conditions and diseases, production of these non-essential acids may be impossible or limited and thus they are deemed conditionally essential.

Protein in the body

When proteins enter the body they come in a tangled form and the body essentially untangles these protein chains and chops them up into little bits of individual amino acids. This process is facilitated by enzymes called Proteases. The acids then are sent throughout the body via the bloodstream and recycled into new proteins, muscle fibers and a whole slew of other things.

Diagram of the muscle protein synthesis process

 

So how does protein become muscles?

We know protein is essential for muscle building as the process of muscle growth takes places when there is more protein synthesis happening than breakdown. 

Exercise is simply the easiest way to induce protein synthesis as when muscles are strained more than normal the tension increases in the muscle fibers. This increased tension of course causes microscopic tears in the fibers which are then repaired by the body through protein synthesis.

What this means for our diet is that it will have to include all of the essential amino acids required for bodily functions whether it be obtained from a plant source or meat those essential acids are clearly vital for just about everything we do.

Spread the word

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *